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Research outline



Living organisms have repeatedly encountered and responded to past drastic climatic and environmental changes which have altered their diversity, ecological interactions and distribution. To better understand the effects of current climate change on biodiversity, it is important to consider the evolutionary responses of species as those processes determine ultimately the speciation and extinction of lineages. Therefore, elucidating the historical events through which species have undergone is of particular importance to understand the mechanisms that have shaped the current diversity of target groups as well as to understand global species richness patterns.


My research is focused on two incredibly successful lineages of insects - butterflies representing the winged groups and ants representing the social taxa. My projects include the use of molecular data, such as DNA sequences and SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) genotypic markers, as well as higher taxonomic level systematics and population-level studies. The main projects in which I am involved are listed below.


  1. Neotropical historical biogeography and butterfly systematics

  2. Satyrine butterflies radiation in the Caribbean

  3. Butterfly diversification in the transitional zone between Asia and Australia (Wallacean region)

  4. Melanesian and South Pacific ant systematics and biogeography